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Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the pentagon budget, plus a minimum 30% tax on million- dollar incomes. republicans are expected to oppose the measure because of the tax increase. house speaker john boehner said the burden is on president obama to break the deadlock. >> the sequester, i don't like it and no one should like it, but the sequester is there because the president insisted that it be there. where is the president's plan to replace the sequester that he insisted upon? >> sreenivasan: white house officials warned that letting the across-the-board cuts take effect would be disastrous. for his part, the president traveled to decatur, georgia, selling his plan to make pre- school available to all four- year-olds. standing before a group of teachers, he joked that what works with pre-schoolers might work with congress. >> maybe we need to bring the teachers up... ( laughter ) you know, every once in a while have some quiet time. time out. ( laughter ) >> sreenivasan: if the sequester takes effect, it will mean $85 billion in spending reductions over the next seven months shared equally between defense and domestic p
out to the pentagon for comment but have not heard back yet. nick robertson is following developments in london. is this the same drone that the united states said was returned to the united states? >> it looks like the same one. the iranians say it was flying 140 miles into their airspace off their northeastern corner, close to the border with afghanistan. the iranians are saying this aircraft was flying from the kandahar airfield base inside afghanistan, and some of the footage, and i looked at it, some of it could be kandahar air base but there's no guarantee this video came from the aircraft in question here. did they get this video from somewhere els? it's not clear. there's no way to verify at the moment what the iranians are saying. the spokesman that the iranians are putting forward says that the aircraft was sent to california several times in 2010 for repair and used for operations inside pakistan. >> translator: this aircraft has had many flights in countries around iran, operations that have taken place in pakistan. this aircraft provided guidance. >> again, no indications
panetta spoke at a pentagon farewell ceremony. he talked about north korea and called on congress to end the uncertainty posed by pending budget cuts known as sequestration. mr. panetta will stay in his position until his successor is confirmed. president obama has nominated former senator chuck hagel to be his replacement. this is half an hour. [applause] >> halt. present. halt. ♪ o say can you see by the dawn's early light snule what so -- what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there o say does that star spangled banner yet wave oaer the land of the free and the home of the brave ♪ >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the director of administration and management, mr. michael rhodes. >> well, welcome, everybody. thank you very much for being here today. as we have an opportunity for the secretary's farewell address to the pentagon c
who is going to be running the pentagon. >> sam? >> well, i slightly disagree with robert. >> i thought you might. >> you know, actually it's funny because some of these questions did produce interesting illustrative answers. for instance when ron johnson got hk to say what difference does it make? well, it does make a difference. the problem i found with the questions was they ended up stepping on the news. they became so dem mon stra tiff and so theatrical that they ended up stealing the spotlight from the answers. that did a disservice in some respects to the question. >> is the real story the feeder of the questions or hagel's fumbling perform snens i think it's the latter. i think hagel had a dismal performance at that hearing. did he seem competent to run the pentagon? there were a lot of questions even among democrats after that hearing whether he's ready. >> i don't disagree with that. i think hagel had a really poor performance. what i'm say something for these senators -- if you looked at what ted cruz was asking about, association with an israeli diplomat that basical
: for the first time, pentagon leaders said today they had supported arming the rebels in syria. defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey chair of the joint chiefs said they made that recommendation to president obama. panetta told a senate hearing that, in the end, the president decided against sending in arms. instead, the u.s. has provided only humanitarian aid to the rebels. secretary panetta also defended the military's response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the assault killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. panetta testified there'd been no specific warning of an imminent attack, so u.s. forces were too far away to respond. >> the united states military, as i've said, is not and frankly should not be a 911 service capable of arriving on the scene within minutes to every possible contingency around the world. the u.s. military has neither the resources nor the responsibility to have a firehouse next to every u.s. facility in the world. >> sreenivasan: republican senator john mccain of arizona argued the military could have deploye
it calls "non- lethal" assistance. and with panetta's departure from the pentagon today, plus clinton's last week and petraeus's resignation in 2012, general dempsey is the only known remaining advocate of arming the rebels still in a top advisory role. i'm joined who served in the obama administration state departments and is now dean of the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. and andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. what were the main schools of thought. how did the camps break down in this argument inside the administration on what to do about syria, andrew? >> basically you have a discussion about syria about all the different options. and it really comes down to this. the white house was hedgingment they really did not want to get involved in syria. they have a firm policy to stay out of the middle east and would like to pull back. at the same time the agencies that deal with syria and the problem there, which is growing and mushrooming, the state department, cia and to a certain extent the department o
and pentagon officials confirmed it today. the decision marks the next phase in the administration's plan to end the u.s. combat role in afghanistan by 2014. there are currently 66,000 american troops in afghanistan, down from a peak of 100,000. a sharply divided senate armed services committee moved today to approve chuck hagel for defense secretary. the party line vote on the former senator was 14-11. his fellow republicans challenged hagel's past statements and votes on israel, iraq and iran's nuclear weapons program, while democrats argued hagel was more than qualified. >> i just believe that the testimony of senator hagel was not reassuring. i don't think he did come across clear and convincing, that he understood our policies toward iran. and the fact that you don't understand why and you can't clearly articulate the bad news for america for the iranians' nuclear capability sharply and to the point is unnerving and for the times in which we live. >> the concern that i have is the suggestion that this man who has served his country really since he was a young man and enlisted in viet
at capitol hill, art tea talking about the impact of the budget cuts on the pentagon. in the senate they are expected to finally clear the way for confirmation vote to chuck hagel who will inherit this budget mess. janet napolitano, you see her on the right there, also speaking live at the brookings institution. and then just moments ago, we heard from a fired-up john boehner who blames the stalemate on the president and the senate. >> we have moved a bill in the house twice. we should not have a move a third bill before the senate gets off their ass and begins to do something. >> i'm joined by military analyst jack jacobs. good to see you. >> good morning. >> if lawmakers can't make this march 1st deadline, $43 billion or 8% will be slushed from the pentagon budget. they have used words like devastating, dire. are they right? how significant would this be? >> very serious indeed. these are across the board cuts. i mean, there's no intelligence or intelligent decisions made on what is going to be cut. so in addition to fact -- and there's plenty of fact -- you are going to cut ammun
's the complement of non -- of folks from the state department that we send? the relationship between the pentagon and the state department seems to have changed as well. how will he weigh in on that? >> yeah, those are good questions. i think if i could just take two examples. with syria and also with afghanistan, you have questions of where the united states has to figure out some next policy steps that are pretty big and get to the question you raise, the balance between troops possibly, between diplomatic advisers, development experts, cia operatives, and where policy in the case of afghanistan has to make some changes, but it's generally on a predetermined course but it's going to have to vary quite a bit because we're drawing down troops now. in syria i think what we have is a policy for all the good intentions hasn't really worked. and if i were secretary kerry, i would probably commission my best people to do a two to four-week study on fundamentally new options in syria. where i think the united states has to recognize that what it's been doing so far hasn't been adequate and yet the coun
in the state department or the pentagon are there. i think at some point the united states government and the white house have to make a decision that syria is an actual danger to america's national security interests. it is not something we can wash our hands from. and there are serious dangers and implications to the united states and the president actually to ask its national security team for realistic options that then he request gather his team and debate and decide about. there hasn't, i think, been a serious debate even with thunited stasgovernment as to what might be our three top options what are the costs and benefits of each. and if we were to pursue one of them, how would we do it. >> is there a legitimate argument that this destabilizes turkey to some degree, an important country to the united states, and a nato ally, andrew. >> absolutely. thousands of syrians go over the border into turkey every day. and it's very easy for pkk fighters, kurdish fighters to meld into those refugees, to go across the border and carry out terrorists attacks insidef tuey. no government in
that is relate to the pentagon and to the u.s. military that will just be held in abians -- >> what do you think the british military and the french think when leon panetta turns up? >> well, they like leon panetta but what they will think is what they have been thinking for the last 2 1/2 years, is that the republican party in the united states has gone off the rails and is obstructing the normal order of business of the world's only super power, and this is the first time, martin, in the history of the defense department going back to the 1940s that there's been a filibuster of a nominee to head that department and i would wager that if it went to its predecessor that the department of war going all the way back in american history, this has never been done. these people are out of control in their obstructionism and the only thing to do is fight them all the way, and there are new tools that the president unveiled in his state of the union to do that with. the president should go to enlisted personnel, retired enlisted personnel all over the united states and say, chuck hagel is the first of
be found throughout physician contractor form. the pentagon as the government's as the government's largest buyer and many contractors rely on the government for their business. we are concerned that the tube .0 version of dod's that are buying power turns away from the fixed-price contract. congress is not one-size-fits-all but losing billions of dollars should be sufficient incentive to control costs. the national nuclear security administration's nuclear weapons laboratories and production plants are operated by private corporations. these government-owned contracts have in some cases increased with inflated overhead cost security breaches and construction cost overruns. on the positive side lawmakers appear ready to uphold the cmr project at los alamos laboratory. acquisition is a major challenge across federal agencies as evidenced by the failures of future combat systems deep water deep water and others. a common thread is the use of lead system integrators. for the governor i saw contractor to get signed it made its neat. i've never yet found a contractocontracto r who was not watch
and put him in place in the pentagon. >> in terms of the way he answered various questions, i know you took issue with the tough question style of republican senators. is the white house pleased with how senator hagel answered questions? >> i believe he did a fine job. if you look, if you take all the news clips, not the whole performance, but the news clips that have dominated television report and on this, they have focused on a series of exchanges that i think, by any estimation, largely represent the injuring over issues like, why did you disagree with me over iraq? we are prepared to say that senator obama had a view on iraq. it was one of the reasons he ran on that position and one in 2008 against senator mccain. he vowed to end the war in iraq in a with a protected our national security interests. now, he is focused on winding down the war in afghanistan. someone bizarrely, and given that we have 56,000 americans in uniform in afghanistan, senators yesterday, in a hearing for the nomination of the secretary of defense asked very few questions about that active war. instead, they
as the secretary steps up the rhetoric about dire cuts at the pentagon if sequestration goes into effect march 1. >>> the man accused of trying to blow up the federal reserve in new york expected to plead guilty to terror charges. officials say he tried to blow up the van with 1,000 pounds of explosives outside the buildings, but the explosives were fake. he is charged with trying to use weapons of mass destruction and trying to thwart al qaeda. >> there are thousands of reasons why people are late to work. traffic? the most common culprit. but not all employees blame jammed roads. a new survey reveals some of the most memorable excuses like -- good ideas for you. my car wouldn't start because the breathalyzer showed i was intoxicated. my car was attacked by a bear. here's the photo of proof. are we going to see it? >>steve: we heard it. >>gretchen: last but not least, my angry wife froze my keys in a glass of water in the freezer. come on. out of those three, that is the most logical one. >>brian: really? i tell you what, i think there is a long line of misdeeds if she is going to that extent t
knife in the drawer at the pentagon. that's the job description. he's not going to the department of the interior. in terms of whether or not republicans will vote to confirm him, democrats need to hold together and get five republicans to confirm him and he should be able to become the next secretary of defense. there are grumblings among republican senators that they may consider putting a hold on his information to extracts more answers from the administration on the issue of benghazi. that this could be leverage to get to the bottom of that debacle and understanding better the administration's timeline, position, since they didn't get straight answers from former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> yeah. >> i think if they do that, it would be a big political mistake. the perception would be very negative for the republicans. >> any single senator can put a hold a nomination. it's been done before. in terms of voting down the nomination, that hasn't happened to a senator since john tower. i don't see that happening. >> let's talk immigration and gun control. both were big t
ballots. >>> "the washington post" reports the pentagon is extending certain benefits to same-sex spouses, it could include housing privileges access to base recreational facilities and joint duty assignments. they are not expected to include health benefits. >>> ryan braun claims he has nothing to hide linked to a miami clinic that allegedly trbted performance-enhancine-enhancing drugs. braun said he used the clinic for consult igss and there was a dispute over monday. >>> the requesting "san francisco chronicle"" says facebook fatigue is settling in. 38% are cutting back and 61% have taken a facebook vacation leaving the site for weeks or longer. >>> "usa today" says chimney sweeps in germany face new competition. many have added to their duties inspecting heating systems and checking for >>> a bit chilly around the bay area, norah, as we have mostly clear skies outside and the sun just coming up on our mount vaca cam looking good there. should be a beautiful day ahead as it looks like this will be the break before we start to see a chance of rain re
on that "washington post" article that came out recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that we keep on about 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the planning process thus far, but can you supported plan that would scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? you know, we are looking at withdrawal of troops in afghanistan, and according to this article from about 8000 down to 1000 within a very short period of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends upon conditions on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood what the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. and i certainly, my advice as a commander on the ground or commander of central command, i would provide my advice based upon where i think the security forces are, a
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)